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June 18, 2018

Edge Mechanics with Corson and Karlsson

Edge Mechanics with Corson and Karlsson

In this video, Jason Yee compares the young stud, Corson Searles, to NHL star Eric Karlsson.

He identifies the edge mechanics that separate the two players and how Corson can better learn to utilize his edges.

To see uninterrupted highlights of Patrick Kane: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNlSryNpWUg

Patrick Kane’s Goal Scoring Formula: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jUIMqe5Ipuc&t=42s

To see Corson’s Hockey Journey: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNdhvyNlEe_q4jaIsXBZb1w
To see Corson’s Instagram: @corsonsearles

To see how I record these videos: https://ift.tt/1zAb4CX
The mic I use: https://ift.tt/2IxbMwM

To read more detailed info: train2point0.com/blog
Follow us on Instagram: @train2point0
Join the convo on Twitter: @train2point0

– Jason

PS. If you want to do a live training with Train 2.0. you can click this link here to get FREE access

June 18, 2018

1on1 Camp with Pavel Barber

1on1 Camp with Pavel Barber

A few weekends back, Jason and Pavel took to the ice to run there high-level 1on1 skills camp, (Barber: forwards Jason: Defense). The video we shot (above) is a “Day in the life” during our 3-day 1on1 camp. We shared information and looked to innovate together. Collaboration and competition together. Catch a little lifestyle. Catch some tidbits. And hopefully you enjoy the music.

Listen to the Train 2.0 Show Podcast: anchor.fm/train2point0show

Check out Train 2.0: www.train2point0.com
Watch awesome slow-motion clips: @train2point0 on Instagram
Follow me on Twitter to learn when we release new articles
Start using TrainAI (and other messenger bots we created for you): m.me/train2point0

– Jason

PS. If you want to do a live training with Train 2.0. you can click this link here to get FREE access

June 18, 2018

The Next Skating Paradigm: Mathew Barzal

The Next Skating Paradigm Mathew Barzal

Barzal turned the league on its head – as a rookie! And he doesn’t do it with pushes or powerful strides…no. It’s with his mastery of the arc. Of getting edges into the ice and using the rocker of the blade plus his mass displacement to skate faster with less effort.

In this video, Jason gives you an introduction into the game-changing skating technique that only a few elite NHL players use – The Downhill Skating System!

Listen to the Train 2.0 Show Podcast: anchor.fm/train2point0show

Check out Train 2.0: www.train2point0.com
Watch awesome slow-motion clips: @train2point0 on Instagram
Follow me on Twitter to learn when we release new articles
Start using TrainAI (and other messenger bots we created for you): m.me/train2point0

– Jason

PS. If you want to do a live training with Train 2.0. you can click this link here to get FREE access

June 1, 2018

Secret To Receiving Passes At Speed – Hidden Asymmetries In Hockey

 

The secret to receiving passes at speed isn’t to improve your hands. It’s to improve your footwork and patterning. You get way more OPTIONS when you take certain routes. And those routes are NOT higher risk. I call this a hidden asymmetry.

The pattern that elite players like Connor McDavid and Sidney Crosby use involves picking the puck up on an arc. This means that as a pass comes to them, they will lean onto the edge of one of their skates and make a slight turn.

There are likely several reasons for this arc (slight turn) in the ice like throwing off the defenders angle, reducing tension in the body, creating an angular attack, etc. Whatever the reason for this asymmetry, you will notice that it occurs extremely often with the elite NHLers when they receive the puck with speed.

Keep an eye out for this asymmetry in the next NHL game you watch. You might just start noticing it happen everywhere.

Listen to the Train 2.0 Show Podcast: anchor.fm/train2point0show

Check out Train 2.0: www.train2point0.com
Watch awesome slow-motion clips: @train2point0 on Instagram
Follow me on Twitter to learn when we release new articles: @train2point0
Start using TrainAI (and other messenger bots we created for you): m.me/train2point0

– Jason

PS. If you want to do a live training with Train 2.0. you can click this link here to get FREE access

May 23, 2018

Finding Ice In Whistler With Pavel Barber

Finding Ice In Whistler With Pavel Barber

What do hockey players do for fun when they aren’t at the rink practicing their craft? When they’re not at the gym grinding out a heavy workout? They spend there extra time searching for new and exciting locations to practice some more! That’s just how your mind works when you love the game as much as we do.

That’s why Pavel Barber, Zack Wear, Andrew Ross and I went on an adventure to find ice to skate on in Whistler, BC. The idea was to film some training videos. Finding ice didn’t work out… but we had fun along the way. We had a few drinks, told a few stories and had a few laughs. It was a great old time with some great guys. Here is our journey as documented by Andrew Ross.

Andrew Ross: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCX7ksYk_ooo8uKDwsumvjyw
@lookitsross

Pavel Barber: https://www.youtube.com/user/MindPuckHandler
@heybarber

Zach Wear: https://ift.tt/2kieLip
@alchemygoaltending

Train 2.0 Instagram: @train2point0
Train 2.0 Twitter: @train2point0
Email: [email protected]

– Jason

PS. If you want to do a live training with Train 2.0. you can click this link here to get FREE access

May 20, 2018

Double Your Zone Entry like Patrick Kane

Double Your Zone Entry like Patrick Kane

In this video, Corson explains the two zone entry patterns that Patrick Kane uses to increase optionality and double his team’s scoring chances. He covers how anyone can use this zone entry pattern to improve their odds of success without improving skills.

He explains that the key to doubling your zone entry is repeating similar patterns that create high levels of optionality. That is why Kane repeats two different entry points that he uses to enter the offensive zone.

Option one – enter wide and cut in towards the middle of the ice. By cutting in, he gives himself several options: he can cut back towards the boards, he can pull the puck out and drive wide to the net, he can take the defenseman on and beat him with a dangle, he can cut across the middle and make a play, and several more options.

Option 2 – enter between the dots. If the opposing team challenges before the blueline line, he passes the puck across to a teammate out wide. If the defenders give the line, he slows down, aims to pull one or two defenders towards the middle, then pass the puck wide to a teammate who has speed and room to drive the net.

These two zone entry patterns are a big part of what makes Patrick Kane so successful when he enters the zone. Try these patterns for yourself and feel the optionality as they help you double your zone entry success.

To see uninterrupted highlights of Patrick Kane: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNlSryNpWUg

Patrick Kane’s Goal Scoring Formula: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jUIMqe5Ipuc&t=42s

To see Corson’s Hockey Journey: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNdhvyNlEe_q4jaIsXBZb1w
To see Corson’s Instagram: @corsonsearles

To see how I record these videos: https://ift.tt/1zAb4CX
The mic I use: https://ift.tt/2IxbMwM

 

May 14, 2018

How to Shoot Like Panarin – Training Footage

How to Shoot Like Panarin – Training Footage

Watch as I breakdown how to shoot like Panarin. I compare Panarin’s in-game footage to my own training footage – analyzing it from the perspective of a kinesiologist. Like you, I’m learning. And I’m documenting the process because I know how this plays out.

What I learned in this video is that timing the foot and release is important to get the same snap as Panarin. I’m also searching for why I kick my leg so high, but he keeps his lower. My thought is that this relates to his preference for rotation – whereas my patterning is used to pushing. Something for me to dive deeper into – and uncover.

I’d love to hear your thoughts, feedback, suggestions. Please email me at [email protected] or DM me at @train2point0 because I’d love to hear from you.

– Jason

PS. If you want to do a live training with Train 2.0. you can click this link here to get FREE access

January 28, 2018

How to Skate Like McDavid – Part 3 (Ankle Flexibility Secret)

How to Skate Like McDavid – Part 3 (Ankle Flexibility Secret)

how to skate like mcdavid - mcdavid skating technique

If you want to learn how skate like McDavid, you need to understand the mechanics behind his stride. We say this often, but these NHL stars are NOT fleshy bags of magic (Thanks to Scott Adams for that term). There are mechanical principles behind their magic. That’s why we call them the Magic Mechanics.

Often overlooked in hockey: ankle mobility. One way that McDavid is able to put freakish force into the ice is with uncommon ankle mobility. In this video we see evidence of this with his off-ice training. And we examine the biomechanics behind why it matters.

Ankle mobility often holds players back from being able to put force into the ice. Not downward force into the ice. But laterally. Skaters like McDavid allow their ankles to “go soft” – which means that the ankle relaxes and the skate is allowed to tip over. This lets the edge dig into the ice.

Most skaters have rigid ankles. They look at “ankle skaters” and sneer – but their own rigidity is holding them back. When you have soft ankles, you reduce the tension of the muscles around your ankle joints and flow like water on the ice.

The effect is like a cart on a rail. From that place of stability, stars like McDavid are able to generate a ton of speed and agility while maintaining balance and control.

If you’d like to learn more about how to skate like McDavid, you can learn more here because he’s a fast skater.

– Jason

January 28, 2018

How to Score Goals In Hockey – Auston Matthews Goal Scoring Formula

Auston Matthews Goals – His Goal Scoring Formula

About 50% of Auston Matthews 39 goals followed a predictable pattern using what we call “Matthews Office” and the “Rhythmic Release”. He also used a pattern called the “Matthews Drive” to capitalize off the rush for 5/39 of his goals. In this video, we do a summary breakdown of these patterns.

If you’d like to see the COMPLETE breakdown, you can learn more here.

Connect with us:
www.train2point0.com
Instagram: @train2point0
Facebook: http://ift.tt/2j9THZf

– Jason

January 28, 2018

How to Score Goals In Hockey – Kucherov Goal Scoring Breakdown

How to Score Goals In Hockey – Kucherov Goal Scoring Breakdown

Today, we breakdown how to score goals in hockey using Nikita Kucherov as an example. You might see how Nikita Kucherov is able to score with such consistency in the 2016-2017 season. He uses 4 different patterns of Magic Mechanics to score his 40 goals. And when we see patterns of Magic Mechanics that achieve in-game results, we call them Patterns of the Pros.

The Patterns of the Pros that we see Kucherov use to score are the lazy 1-timer, the Royal 1-timer, the Non-Cherry Pattern, and the Stealth Deception Footwork. Kucherov layers a lot of skating Magic Mechanics into these patterns.

The Lazy 1-Timer looks like the kind of shot that a coach would tell you looks “lazy”. You saunter up to the puck, spin and shoot. But the spin sets up a powerful release that is also deceptive to the goalie.

The Royal 1-Timer is a one-timer that occurs off a royal road pass. The Magic Mechanics of the 1-Timer are necessary to hit a Royal 1-Timer. And the best in the world at this is Ovechkin.

royal-road-hockey-shot

Credit to The Hockey News for this image

The Non-Cherry pattern is a fun one – since Don Cherry never wants players cutting to the middle…but Kucherov does it anyway. He uses this pattern in a couple ways. Either with the puck to create space for himself. Or he drops the puck and uses this to create a 2on1 opportunity.

Lastly, he uses something called stealth footwork to setup wrist shots. He crosses over before he sets his feet. This crossover changes the angle and makes it hard for the goalie to read. The key to this is to be able to transition from crossover to plant to shot smoothly.

If you watched the breakdown and read this little summary, you might be interested in the full breakdown of Kucherov’s goal scoring. You can access a full video breakdown here because you get a lot more detail when it is visual.

To your constant and never-ending improvement,

– Jason