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June 18, 2018

Edge Mechanics with Corson and Karlsson

Edge Mechanics with Corson and Karlsson

In this video, Jason Yee compares the young stud, Corson Searles, to NHL star Eric Karlsson.

He identifies the edge mechanics that separate the two players and how Corson can better learn to utilize his edges.

To see uninterrupted highlights of Patrick Kane: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNlSryNpWUg

Patrick Kane’s Goal Scoring Formula: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jUIMqe5Ipuc&t=42s

To see Corson’s Hockey Journey: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNdhvyNlEe_q4jaIsXBZb1w
To see Corson’s Instagram: @corsonsearles

To see how I record these videos: https://ift.tt/1zAb4CX
The mic I use: https://ift.tt/2IxbMwM

To read more detailed info: train2point0.com/blog
Follow us on Instagram: @train2point0
Join the convo on Twitter: @train2point0

– Jason

PS. If you want to do a live training with Train 2.0. you can click this link here to get FREE access

June 18, 2018

1on1 Camp with Pavel Barber

1on1 Camp with Pavel Barber

A few weekends back, Jason and Pavel took to the ice to run there high-level 1on1 skills camp, (Barber: forwards Jason: Defense). The video we shot (above) is a “Day in the life” during our 3-day 1on1 camp. We shared information and looked to innovate together. Collaboration and competition together. Catch a little lifestyle. Catch some tidbits. And hopefully you enjoy the music.

Listen to the Train 2.0 Show Podcast: anchor.fm/train2point0show

Check out Train 2.0: www.train2point0.com
Watch awesome slow-motion clips: @train2point0 on Instagram
Follow me on Twitter to learn when we release new articles
Start using TrainAI (and other messenger bots we created for you): m.me/train2point0

– Jason

PS. If you want to do a live training with Train 2.0. you can click this link here to get FREE access

June 18, 2018

The Next Skating Paradigm: Mathew Barzal

The Next Skating Paradigm Mathew Barzal

Barzal turned the league on its head – as a rookie! And he doesn’t do it with pushes or powerful strides…no. It’s with his mastery of the arc. Of getting edges into the ice and using the rocker of the blade plus his mass displacement to skate faster with less effort.

In this video, Jason gives you an introduction into the game-changing skating technique that only a few elite NHL players use – The Downhill Skating System!

Listen to the Train 2.0 Show Podcast: anchor.fm/train2point0show

Check out Train 2.0: www.train2point0.com
Watch awesome slow-motion clips: @train2point0 on Instagram
Follow me on Twitter to learn when we release new articles
Start using TrainAI (and other messenger bots we created for you): m.me/train2point0

– Jason

PS. If you want to do a live training with Train 2.0. you can click this link here to get FREE access

June 4, 2018

How to know if you want it bad enough to make the NHL – And what to do about it

Today we learn how to measure the common illusions known as “discipline” and “motivation”.

If you’re skeptical of this statement because discipline and motivation being illusions, let me agree with you. We can probably agree that discipline and motivation look real. What else could explain why someone would practice something for so long? Allow me to suggest another reason…

Fun.

Want some proof that motivation and discipline are not real?

One morning you may wake up with this mysterious thing called “Motivation” and make big plans. Decide you want something really bad. Go out and practice really hard and long.

But when you’re tired, hungry, or stressed, that thing called motivation disappears. Motivation comes and goes. So it is something we believe in when we’re motivated. But disappears when we need it most. Don’t you aree that it’s better to call it an illusion than to rely on it?

When you realize that motivation is bullshit – you might release yourself from blame.

Now just because motivation is bullshit doesn’t mean that you are not responsible for performance. In fact, knowing that motivation and discipline are bullshit is the first step to taking FULL responsibility.

If you design a system that relies on willpower, it is a BAD system. You are responsible for this and the outcomes that you will generate.

For example, if you decide to improve your skating, but you don’t own rollerblades, the rink you skate at is 56 minutes away, the ice is horrible, and the coaches are abusive…what are the chances you will work on your skating?

How about if you have an outdoor rink in your backyard? Or maybe you have a clear space in your garage to rollerblade and you invested in a pair of Marsblades. Or maybe you have a great parking lot next door. The chances are much higher that you will work on your skating.

So here’s how you know if you want it bad enough:

When presented with a training environment, do you usually start training on it?

Here’s what I usually see…players who are obsessive about hockey will approach a training environment and start interacting with it. They see a super deker and they start stickhandling. They see a shooting pad and they start taking shots. They see a place to rollerblade and some rollerblades that are free to use and they start rollerblading.

Players who don’t want it will just stand there. Or they’ll ignore it. Or they’ll grow bored really quick.

The players who want it bad enough are obsessed.

It comes down to one thing: Training Friction.

Tap credit cards are great right? So easy to tap and pay. It removes friction. So people pay more with them.

In-App Purchases are also great right? So easy to just put your thumb down and pay for something. So people use in-app purchases lots.

One way to get in better shape isn’t to set goals, buy a gym membership, or work really hard. It’s to hire a trainer so that you’re accountable to someone 1on1. It’s to put your workout clothes right at the foot of your bed so that in the morning you can’t help but step on them. This is how to remove Training Friction.

You should spend disproportionate amounts of energy setting up your training environment so it’s easier to train than to not train.

That is the 80/20 of discipline and motivation. The hidden asymmetry.

If a kid gets dropped off at the rink with a stick and puck and there’s open ice – what do you think is gonna happen?

If a kid has a training area already set up – what do you think is gonna happen?

I routinely end up on the ice for 60-90 minutes longer than I planned. I routinely end up in the Pavel Barber Sport lab much longer than I said I would. Once I’m there I literally can’t help it. This is the benefit of setting up the right training environment.

And if you go through the trouble of setting up the right training environment, and the player just sits there, or ignores it, or stares at the ceiling – then you KNOW that this isn’t the activity. Hockey isn’t the sport. You know they don’t want it bad enough and you can cut your losses right then and there.

Convenience is king.

Taking full responsibility for performance means setting up intelligent systems and automating habits so that you generate the results you want. It is BAD system design if you ignore the idea of Training Friction.

Take full responsibility for your results by using those “motivated moments” to design and implement the lowest training friction environment.

-Jason

June 2, 2018

Hockey Drill Of The Day

Hockey used to have a Human Resource Problem. Not today.

If there was a really good coach in New York, but you lived in Winnipeg, you MIGHT get a chance to work with that coach if they happened to have a camp in Winnipeg. Or perhaps your family has the means to go to a camp in New York. But ultimately, if you lived in Winnipeg, and the master coach was in New York – you were kinda screwed while the players in NY were not.

That problem doesn’t exist anymore. Why? The internet. Problems that used to be human resource problems are now only “information problems”.

So that’s why I built the Hockey Drill Of The Day. 15 Drills. 15 Drills that I use as a professional hockey player. 15 Drills I designed as a kinesiologist. Sent to you for free. Something that you can practice at home.

 

It seems more democratic to have players succeed who are willing to search for the right information – and put in the work. Versus players who are lucky and happen to live in the same city as a master coach. The internet is helping to move things that way.

I dream of players coming out of the bush, playing on ponds all their life, perhaps in Northern Scandinavia, or the Yukon… but who happen to have some great wifi thanks to Elon Musk or Jeff Bezos or someone … who stickhandle better than Kane…or shoot harder than Laine.

Our members LOVE watching our videos, learning, and participating in our Facebook Group. And the feedback they give us is that they LOVE it so much, they want to take it with them to practice. So we’re working on becoming a more usable resource.

The first thought that might come to mind is: Build an App!

This is a good idea. But I can’t code. So the build time would take too long. And every time we need to make a change it would take too long and cost too much.

What I prefer is a direct channel to Players, Parents and Coaches. Enter Messenger Chatbots.

We create Messenger Bots through Facebook. This allows us to deliver value, and gather feedback from you really fast.

We can quickly and easily make adjustments to the flow and content. And we can personlize your experience. A coach in Florida doesn’t want the same experience as a player in Calgary or a mom in Sweden. We can customize the experience just for you! Plus, we have a ton of flexibility in how we deliver you content. And what content we send you.

We built two bots already called WODbot and TrainAI. And players, parents, and coaches absolutely love them. They use them all the time. So we decided to build some more. Like Drill Of The Day.

If you’d like to get one drill per day sent to you from Train 2.0 for free, you can do that here.

Thanks for reading today!

-Jason

June 1, 2018

Secret To Receiving Passes At Speed – Hidden Asymmetries In Hockey

 

The secret to receiving passes at speed isn’t to improve your hands. It’s to improve your footwork and patterning. You get way more OPTIONS when you take certain routes. And those routes are NOT higher risk. I call this a hidden asymmetry.

The pattern that elite players like Connor McDavid and Sidney Crosby use involves picking the puck up on an arc. This means that as a pass comes to them, they will lean onto the edge of one of their skates and make a slight turn.

There are likely several reasons for this arc (slight turn) in the ice like throwing off the defenders angle, reducing tension in the body, creating an angular attack, etc. Whatever the reason for this asymmetry, you will notice that it occurs extremely often with the elite NHLers when they receive the puck with speed.

Keep an eye out for this asymmetry in the next NHL game you watch. You might just start noticing it happen everywhere.

Listen to the Train 2.0 Show Podcast: anchor.fm/train2point0show

Check out Train 2.0: www.train2point0.com
Watch awesome slow-motion clips: @train2point0 on Instagram
Follow me on Twitter to learn when we release new articles: @train2point0
Start using TrainAI (and other messenger bots we created for you): m.me/train2point0

– Jason

PS. If you want to do a live training with Train 2.0. you can click this link here to get FREE access

June 1, 2018

How Elite Shooting Is Elite Skating

McDavid doesn’t have the best shot, but he has an NHL level shot.

Laine isn’t the best skater, but he’s an NHL level skater.

We can probably agree that Dahlin’s shot isn’t his biggest asset. It’s probably skating with the puck.

Do you ever wonder if something ties the two together? And does this extend to stickhandling too?

I came up with a two-part model for hockey mastery. I call it Yee-ing and Yang.

I simplified my previous model which looked something like this…

Simple is usually better.

Awareness takes two forms:

  1. Awareness of real world mechanics (usually in the form of physics, biomechanics)
  2. Awareness of self (movement, ego awareness)

Inherent to that, we also have:

  • Contrast: Comparison between best practices and yourself
  • Innovation: Combining elements of best practices to create better practices

Many of you know that I did a lot of reps when I was younger. I blamed myself for not making the NHL.

Work harder. Do more reps. Practice more. That’s what I told myself.

The problem with my reps was that I didn’t have awareness. No awareness of best practices. Minimal awareness of my own movement. And so minimal awareness of the difference between the two.

The mission of Train 2.0 is to bring awareness to the players who are willing to put in the reps. It’s a pain point for me. And I’m extremely empathetic to the player who wants to put in the reps but isn’t getting the results they want. And it comes down to awareness. Here we shine the spotlight of attention on the mechanics top performers use so you can improve your self-awareness.

Last post we discussed Dahlin’s Internal hip rotation. Today we discuss how your shooting is built on top of hip rotation. And how most skating styles shut off hip rotation – making it challenging for players to transition from skating to shooting.

In my post on how to skate like MacKinnon, I claim that skating isn’t about holding your pelvis still while your feet move…but rotating your pelvis in space as your feet dig into the ice. In this article, I make the same claim about shooting.

Elite hockey players understand that all hockey movements are different in degree – not kind.

A left turn isn’t much different from a deke left. A deke isn’t much different from a shot.

When you grasp the principles of these hockey movements, you’ve grasped it all. One explanation for the NHL elite skaters are also pretty good NHL shooters effect.

These clips are from the exact same play. In the clip, Dahlin receives a pass, fakes a shot, then shoots. The main thing is that both skating movements are identical. The only difference is what the hands do. Do they release the puck or control the puck?

The skating movements we see are:

  • Wide stance (corkscrew)
  • Unload left foot and transfer weight to right foot
  • Soften left ankle and knee to allow the hips to rotate
  • Hold inside edge of right foot
  • Twist hip towards the net
  • Then:
    • Either allow the hips to twist then catch the puck on the backhand and pull to forehand
    • As you allow the hips to twist, release the puck towards the net (shoot!)

This is optionality in a nutshell. Being able to hit two different movement options from the same position. He can probably hit even more options depending on what he sees. Here’s an example of the same skating setup and yet another option.

The point is that the fake shot, shot, and pull across the body are all built off the same skating foundation.

In my play, if I made a fake, I was off balance for the second move. Let alone the third or fourth – like we see with Dahlin. My skating was powerful, but my pelvis was fixed in position while I used my legs to push to change direction. This is the difference between skating downhill (which is like skiing) and push power skating (which is like skateboarding). And it held me back.

A player should seek to make their movements “Adaptable”. Each movement should be able to blend into 3-4 other movements. The key is to use your edges, your rocker, and your hip rotation in each movement. Don’t stomp. push, or hold your core still – as many coaches instruct.

The Downhill Skating System is a course we developed to help you learn the mechanics of Downhill Skating. If we talk about the Yee-ing Yang Model of Hockey Mastery for a second…

…I’d hate to see players who are willing to put in the reps, not reach their potential because they don’t have the awareness. You might be wondering how I got to my level of awareness. It honestly took me taking a degree in kinesiology at the University of British Columbia, playing hockey for 25 years (sometimes professionally), coaching for over ten years (including other pros), and studying thousands of hours of video. I’d like to share that with you – and I put that into the step by step video course: Downhill Skating System.

That said, I always like to mention that you can still learn the principles even if now isn’t the right time to invest in the course. Pay close attention to my blogs, podcasts, and YouTube videos. Then put in the work. That’s what I did, and you can do it too! Either way, I want to ensure you’re empowered to take action. Either to get started on the Downhill Skating System through the course, or putting in the work to learn the principles yourself. It is quite literally game changing.

Thanks for reading today!

-Jason

May 23, 2018

Finding Ice In Whistler With Pavel Barber

Finding Ice In Whistler With Pavel Barber

What do hockey players do for fun when they aren’t at the rink practicing their craft? When they’re not at the gym grinding out a heavy workout? They spend there extra time searching for new and exciting locations to practice some more! That’s just how your mind works when you love the game as much as we do.

That’s why Pavel Barber, Zack Wear, Andrew Ross and I went on an adventure to find ice to skate on in Whistler, BC. The idea was to film some training videos. Finding ice didn’t work out… but we had fun along the way. We had a few drinks, told a few stories and had a few laughs. It was a great old time with some great guys. Here is our journey as documented by Andrew Ross.

Andrew Ross: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCX7ksYk_ooo8uKDwsumvjyw
@lookitsross

Pavel Barber: https://www.youtube.com/user/MindPuckHandler
@heybarber

Zach Wear: https://ift.tt/2kieLip
@alchemygoaltending

Train 2.0 Instagram: @train2point0
Train 2.0 Twitter: @train2point0
Email: [email protected]

– Jason

PS. If you want to do a live training with Train 2.0. you can click this link here to get FREE access

May 20, 2018

Double Your Zone Entry like Patrick Kane

Double Your Zone Entry like Patrick Kane

In this video, Corson explains the two zone entry patterns that Patrick Kane uses to increase optionality and double his team’s scoring chances. He covers how anyone can use this zone entry pattern to improve their odds of success without improving skills.

He explains that the key to doubling your zone entry is repeating similar patterns that create high levels of optionality. That is why Kane repeats two different entry points that he uses to enter the offensive zone.

Option one – enter wide and cut in towards the middle of the ice. By cutting in, he gives himself several options: he can cut back towards the boards, he can pull the puck out and drive wide to the net, he can take the defenseman on and beat him with a dangle, he can cut across the middle and make a play, and several more options.

Option 2 – enter between the dots. If the opposing team challenges before the blueline line, he passes the puck across to a teammate out wide. If the defenders give the line, he slows down, aims to pull one or two defenders towards the middle, then pass the puck wide to a teammate who has speed and room to drive the net.

These two zone entry patterns are a big part of what makes Patrick Kane so successful when he enters the zone. Try these patterns for yourself and feel the optionality as they help you double your zone entry success.

To see uninterrupted highlights of Patrick Kane: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNlSryNpWUg

Patrick Kane’s Goal Scoring Formula: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jUIMqe5Ipuc&t=42s

To see Corson’s Hockey Journey: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNdhvyNlEe_q4jaIsXBZb1w
To see Corson’s Instagram: @corsonsearles

To see how I record these videos: https://ift.tt/1zAb4CX
The mic I use: https://ift.tt/2IxbMwM

 

May 14, 2018

How to Shoot Like Panarin – Training Footage

How to Shoot Like Panarin – Training Footage

Watch as I breakdown how to shoot like Panarin. I compare Panarin’s in-game footage to my own training footage – analyzing it from the perspective of a kinesiologist. Like you, I’m learning. And I’m documenting the process because I know how this plays out.

What I learned in this video is that timing the foot and release is important to get the same snap as Panarin. I’m also searching for why I kick my leg so high, but he keeps his lower. My thought is that this relates to his preference for rotation – whereas my patterning is used to pushing. Something for me to dive deeper into – and uncover.

I’d love to hear your thoughts, feedback, suggestions. Please email me at [email protected] or DM me at @train2point0 because I’d love to hear from you.

– Jason

PS. If you want to do a live training with Train 2.0. you can click this link here to get FREE access